Product Care

General Product Care

– Always carefully lift furniture when moving it around the home and never drag.

– Rotate cushions regularly to even out the wear and fading.

– Regularly vacuum upholstery furniture using the upholstery attachment.

– Use floor protectors on the bottom of furniture (like tables and chairs) to minimise damage to floor coverings.

– Use coasters, place mats, tablecloths and table runners to protect furniture surfaces from heat, scratching and stains.

– Don’t place any indoor furniture in direct sunlight as this may cause fabric, leather and other materials to fade or crack. Direct sunlight includes sunlight through a window – use curtains or blinds to protect your furniture.

– Don’t place furniture too close to a heater or air conditioning vent as this may distort the material or surface finish.

– Don’t sit on the arms of the sofas and chairs.

– Avoid standing on a chair or rocking on the back of it, as this may weaken the structure and possibly cause joint failure.

 

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Please browse this section for tips on caring for your furniture and homewares, and for dealing with common spills or accidents.

Please note, the information provided is for guidance only, and is applicable to keekï products. For further and more specific advice, please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 97915200.

When you invest in quality furniture you want to know that it will last. Understanding upholstery and how to clean and care for your upholstered furniture will retain the look that made you fall in love with it in the first place. With proper cleaning, care and maintenance, it is possible to have all your fabric pieces looking its best for a long time. It pays to be consistent, and it’s not hard to do.

Prolonging the wear life of your furniture is simple

Spot cleaning

Treat spills and stains as soon as possible. Test on a hidden area to ensure fabric and colour are not removed. Gently scrape any soil or mop any liquid from the surface of the fabric. Use of soap or detergent with water should be approached with caution since overzealous rinsing to remove soap residue may result in over-wetting, water marking and possible wetting of substructure (this may create other stains or damage products).

Our spot cleaning advice is offered in good faith and should not be considered as a guarantee that all stains may be removed. It is important that you use these guidelines in conjunction with the care instructions on the product label supplied on your furniture.

For severe stains please consult a professional upholstery cleaning company.

For non-oil based stains

Use warm water and non toilet soaps which do not contain optical brighteners (consider Velvet soap, Lux Flakes, Softly). Mix a small amount of soap and warm water solution and apply to the stain, rubbing gently. Blot dry with a clean towel. Apply cool water (preferably rain or distilled water) and blot dry again. Then with a hair dryer working out from the centre of the stain, dry quickly to prevent rings forming. It is generally preferable to clean whole panels of fabric in this way rather than trying to spot clean specific areas.

For oil based stains

Following the same basic guidelines as above, apply a proprietary brand solvent based cleaner and try to clean generally in panels rather than spot cleaning specific areas. A helpful industry ‘secret’ is for spot removal of oil based biro marks by the application of a conventional hair spray.

To further enhance spot cleaning results, keekï recommends keekï ultimate fabric kit.

Alcoholic Beverages

After the moisture has been blotted up, dab at the stain with a clean cloth dampened in rubbing alcohol. Then blot repeatedly with liquid detergent mixed with cool water. Blot dry with a towel. Dab again with clear cool water and blot dry.

Blood

Mix one teaspoon of ammonia in a cup of cold water and apply it sparingly to the spot. Blot with a clean towel. Repeat the procedure until the spot is gone. Then dab the area with cool water and blot. Wait 15 minutes and moisten the area again with white distilled vinegar. Blot thoroughly with a dry towel.

Chenille Yarn Fabrics

Shampoo clean or hot-water extraction, taking care to restore the pile orientation in finishing will produce a satisfactory result. Care must be taken not to undertake concentrated rubbing on a small area, which may produce irreversible disruption of the chenille fibre. It should be noted that even the simple act of wetting the fabric is likely to produce an appearance change even if the chenille fibre is not disrupted. This is largely due to flattening of the chenille fibre while it is wet and may result in a ‘dappled’ or ‘mottled’ surface.
Warning: Some high pile viscose rayon chenilles, velvets and pocket weave jacquards may change in surface character if stain repellent treatments are applied. Extra care should be taken to pre-test for these fabrics.

Chewing Gum

Rub an ice cube over the gum to harden it, and then scrape off the excess with a dull knife. To remove what is left, use dry cleaning fluid.

Chocolate (and other soft candy)

This is a combination of greasy/non-greasy stain. Scrape excess away, and then go over the spot with cool water mixed with a liquid detergent. Blot thoroughly and then clean with dry cleaning fluid.

Coffee and Tea

Sponge with warm water. Apply warm glycerine*. Leave for 30 minutes. Flush out with water and dry quickly.

Cosmetics

Sponge with warm water. Apply warm glycerine*. Leave for 30 minutes. Flush out with water and dry quickly.

Fruit and Fruit Juices

After excess is blotted up or scraped away, blot the spot with cool water. If a stain remains, add liquid detergent and a drop of vinegar to the water. Dab the spot with this mixture and blot until there’s no trace of a stain. Then go over the area lightly with clear water to remove traces of vinegar.

Grease (including hair grease and oil)

Scrape away excess if necessary and then dab repeatedly at the stain with dry cleaning fluid.
If any stain remains, go over the area with a lukewarm mixture of liquid detergent and water. Always make sure you use a clean portion so you don’t put the stain back in the fabric. Lastly, go over the area with a clean cloth moistened with cool clear water.

Ice Cream

Scrape away excess and apply cool water mixed with liquid detergent, blotting frequently with a dry cloth so as not to saturate the fabric. Let dry and then go over any remaining stain with dry cleaning fluid. Blot dry.

Ink

Moisten with warm glycerine*. Leave for 10 minutes. Apply liquid detergent and brush lightly. Flush out with water and dry quickly.

Iodine

Rub with cut lemon before sponging with warm water. Apply small quantity of detergent with clean cloth. Blot stain then remove soapy residue with cloth wrung out in warm water and white vinegar solution (1/3 vinegar to 2/3 water).

Milk and Vomit

Blot or scrape away the excess, then take a clean soft cloth and blot. Apply clear cool water to the area, blotting frequently. Then blot with a detergent solution to which you’ve added a small amount of ammonia. Blot dry and wait a few minutes. Go over the area with dry cleaning fluid, blot dry. Finally, blot the area lightly with a cloth moistened with rubbing alcohol.

Shoe Polish

Apply liquid paraffin to loosen the stain, and then sponge with dry cleaning fluid.

Soft Drinks, Sweets and Syrups

Sponge with water, add warm glycerine* and work into stain. Flush out with water and dry.

Urine

It is especially important to treat this stain right away, before the urine dries. Otherwise, the urine may react with the fabric dyes and cause permanent discolouration. First, dab at the stain with a solution of white vinegar and water and blot dry. Then apply a mixture of liquid detergent and cool water, blotting frequently and with a dry cloth to avoid saturating the fabric. Finally, dab the spot with clear cool water and blot thoroughly.

Water Spots

Blot thoroughly and then dampen the entire spot with clear white vinegar. Wait a few minutes. When the area is dry, moisten it again with clear water, blotting with a dry cloth after every application of the damp cloth. If the fabric has a pile, brush in the direction of the pile when it is dry.

Wine – red

It is extremely important to treat this stain right away, before the wine dries and sets into the fabric. Blot as much of the liquid up as possible with a clean soft cloth, do not rub. If white wine is on hand, dab a small amount on to the stain to neutralize the colour and blot with clean cloth. If white wine is not available, dab a little cool water on to the stain and blot with clean cloth. Apply a layer of table salt to soak up any remaining moisture, vacuuming off after 20-30 minutes. If the stain is on a removable cover, wash or dry clean according to the product care label. If not, blot with clean water and allow to air dry.

*Pure glycerine can be purchased from most chemists, as it’s commonly used as the base for cosmetics and soaps.
What you should know about fabric

Bleaching

Chlorine is a bleach and will damage fibres. Swimming costumes, can leave a water mark on the fabric, and can contribute to bleaching, mould growth and dye transfer.

Chenille Yarn Fabrics

Fabrics using chenille yarn constructions from viscose, rayon, acrylic, polyester or cotton fibres will behave like most pile or napped fabrics during service, i.e. orientation of pile fibres will be disrupted when sat upon, resulting in an apparently different shade on contact areas. This disruption of the pile fibres and consequent apparent colour change are inherent characteristics and should not be considered as defects.

Colour Fastness

All fabrics are tested to Australian Industry Standards. It is important to note that no fabric is 100% colour fast and that it is impossible to prevent colours fading if adequate precautions are not taken in the home. Winter sun, sitting lower in the sky, can cause the most damage, particularly when protective curtains have been pulled back to ‘warm the room’.

Fading

Colours with which the fabrics are dyed, particularly bright colours will be susceptible to light fading depending on the degree of exposure. Some fabric damage will be evident where fading is most pronounced. In situations where rooms are northerly facing or exposed to constant daylight we recommend Jacquard woven or Vat Dye printed furnishings. Sun damage: constant exposure to the direct rays of the sun will break down fabric fibres, causing them to become brittle and resulting in the affected area breaking when cleaned.

General Care

When arranging your furniture, care should be taken to avoid touching external walls or radiators to prevent problems of moisture build up and/or scorching damage. Take care to prevent sharp objects such as rings, buckles and pets’ claws from coming into contact with your furniture, as this may cause snagging or tearing of the fabric. Vacuum regularly (weekly) using low suction. Rotate reversible cushions regularly. Protect from direct sunlight.

Oxidation

Fumes from chimneys, auto exhausts, open fires, gas fires, stoves, or wherever combustion is present, produce a sulphur compound which when combined with humidity and oxygen in the air produce a mild sulphuric acid. This matter is absorbed by or clings to the furnishing fabric and contributes to discolouration and deterioration of the fabric.

Pilling

Pilling or balling can occur occasionally as a result of normal daily wear and should not be considered a fault. There are many variables which can trigger pilling, including climatic conditions, atmospheric purity and user environment. Even specific clothing types (fleecy tracksuits etc) can transfer pills from the clothing to the furniture fabric. As the fabric surface is rubbed, a single or small group of loose fibres on the surface begins to twist upon itself, forming tiny balls or ‘pills’. Often the catalyst that starts this process is a foreign fibre or speck of dirt. Pilling can be successfully removed with a battery operated pilling tool available from most department stores. ‘De-pilling’ only removes unsightly loose surface fibres and does not affect fabric quality or performance. Regular vacuuming and cleaning will remove dirt and grime and any loose fibres which will help prevent pills forming.

Velvet and Pile fabrics

Velvet is a luxurious textile created by a complex double weaving process that results in a densely plush nap. Shading, marking & texturing of the pile are an inherent characteristic of velvet and should not be considered a fault. For spills use a super-absorbent clean cloth and soak up the excess liquid. Do not dab or rub the spill, as this will force the liquid deeper into the fibres. Instead, leave the cloth in place until most or all of the liquid has been absorbed. Then air-dry the fabric. Vacuum any accumulated dust or dirt with a special upholstery attachment for velvet or place a piece of pantyhose over the nozzle. This will also remove any fuzz that has formed on the surface of the fabric.

Professional Cleaning Frequency

This is determined by the furniture use, your own maintenance, upkeep and environmental conditions. As a good ‘rule of thumb’ overall cleaning is recommended every 12 months for most family room lounges.

Professional Fabric Servicing

Keekï recommend the keekï Fabric Seal Protection System. Other products that are water-based ‘Fluro chemical’ type fabric protectors (such as DuPont Teflon® and 3M Scotchgard®) are also recommended but should be applied by licensed applicators only. Check your care label first to see if a mill-applied protection was incorporated during fabric manufacture. It is not necessary to apply an after-market protector over mill-applied protectors on new fabrics. Fabric protectors do not eliminate the need for vacuuming, routine cleaning or proper care. They will however, make spot cleaning and vacuuming quicker, easier and more efficient between professional cleans and keep your fabric looking cleaner longer, as well as extending its life. Professionals applying fabric protectors must always pre-test to qualify fabric suitability.

Keekï Furniture Care Fabric Protection

We recommend you have your upholstered furniture protected with keekï Fabric Seal Protection. This protection covers you for five (5) years against any accidental stains, spills and soiling. This protection will extend the life of your fabric by allowing soiling to be more readily released and liquid spills become easier to soak up. Protected fabrics with a soil repellent finish still require regular vacuuming and immediate attention in the case of spills or soiling.

For further information, advice or to make an appointment please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 9791 5200.
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Faux leather (commonly known as leather look, synthetic leather, pu leather or vinyl) is a less expensive, more durable synthetic alternative to real leather.  Whether used in a busy commercial environment where spills, dirt and use are common, or a house full of little ones leaving a trail of crumbs and mess, synthetic upholstery is a great choice to keep your furniture looking new, clean and stylish for years to come.

For all its durability, faux leather must still be well cared for and regularly cleaned to preserve its lifespan.

Prolonging the wear life of your furniture is simple

Ensure your furniture avoids the following conditions:

Special Note: Though strong, faux leather is also a porous material. It will absorb a stain very quickly. And it’s not just a spilled cup of juice or a few drops of coffee that you need to worry about. Fabrics that bleed, like dark blue jeans or cushions with vibrant, bright colours, often leave their mark on absorbent, faux leather surfaces. Harsh and abrasive cleaners and sponges that you might be tempted to use to remove such stains, can scratch the smooth surface or turn your smooth, supple seat into a hard, brittle one.

Cleaning

For general care we recommend regular dusting with a clean, dry cloth. In most instances, commercial cleaning products should be avoided, as they can be harsh on the faux leather or its protective coating. It is recommended that you use the keekï Euro Leather Cleaner. Proximity to heaters, fireplaces and direct sunlight should be avoided as this can cause faux leather to fade or crack over time.

For tea/coffee, soft drink, jam or other sugary products; use a clean, dry cloth or paper towel to quickly remove the liquid from the surface. Then gently remove the stain with a clean wet cloth, working from outside inwards. Do not soak the surface. Do not use a hair dryer or heater to dry your faux leather; blotting with a dry cloth is a much better approach.

For greasy stains like tomato sauce, chocolate or Vegemite; use an absorbent paper towel and apply just enough pressure to remove the substance. Avoid pushing or rubbing the substance further in to the faux leather. Use warm water and non toilet soaps which do not contain optical brighteners (consider Velvet soap, Lux Flakes, Softly) and use a dry towel to gently clean the stain, working from outside to the centre of the stain.

Light Cleaning

Once a week wipe down with a clean, slightly damp dye fast cloth to remove dust and grime. Careful vacuuming with a suitable brush attachment is recommended for the removal of day to day dust, crumbs and other minor debris.

Stain Removal

The removal of marks as soon as they are noticed invariably assists in the removal. If you cannot remove a mark with the keekï Euro Leather Cleaner as directed, don’t persist as you may damage the leather. Consult keekï or a leather repair company.

Spillage Removal

Soak up fluids as quickly as possible, removing the cushions (if loose) using a colour-fast towel. Wipe over your faux leather, rinsing cloth out in cold water and cleaning as you go. Whilst the area is still wet, clean using the keekï Euro Leather Cleaner.

For further information, advice or to make an appointment please contact keekï online customer service on 03 9791 5200

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When you invest in quality leather furniture you want to know that it will last. Understanding leather and how to clean and care for your leather furniture will retain the look that made you fall in love with it in the first place. With proper cleaning, care and maintenance, it is possible to have all your leather pieces looking its best for a long time. It pays to be consistent, and it’s not hard to do.

Soft, supple and highly durable, leather is a versatile and universally popular upholstery cover for furniture. The best quality upholstery leathers breathe and feel cool in summer and warm during winter. Upholstery leather is made from animal skins, which are a by-product from the beef-cattle meat industry and offer a time-proven, sustainable solution for upholstering quality furniture. The hides are made ready for upholstery by tanning, which is a series of treatments that soften, pigment, beautify and protect the hides.

If your new keekï sofa feels or looks a little different to the one you saw in the store (the seat may feel firmer; the leather may look tighter), that’s because your furniture is brand new, unlike the store’s floor sample which may have already been well ‘run-in’ by many visitors. Like a new pair of shoes, with regular use your new furniture will also gradually begin to adapt to your expectations. An advantage to bear in mind is that a fine sofa or chair doesn’t wear out, it wears in. This also means that your sofa can (and will) relax into a more casual appearance over time. When pressure is applied to the polyurethane foam for the first time, the micro cells within the foam structure break which creates a slight softening effect. This natural cellular breakdown is expected and has been designed to achieve far greater comfort. It also means that during the first few weeks of use comfort creases and wrinkles will form naturally in the leather. This is quite normal and adds to the beauty of your leather furniture.

What you should know about leather

Leather is a natural product, therefore every hide has it’s own unique characteristics that tell the past of a cowhide. These include: Vein lines, horn butts, scrapes, insect stings, thorn scratches, fat and neck wrinkles, healed scars, skin blemishes, leather folds etc. The appearance of these characteristics varies from minimal to prominent, depending on the hide selection and processing. These characteristics are not defects in leather, nor do they reduce the performance or longevity of the leather and are hallmarks of genuine quality leather, which adds to the uniqueness and should be embraced as an integral part of your furniture’s history.

Dyes are absorbed differently throughout the hide and some colour variation is normal and expected. Colour variation ranges from slight in pigmented top-coat protected finishes, to distinct, in semi or full aniline finished leathers, with no colour pigments.

Aniline Leather

The aniline dyeing process produces magnificent feeling leather in its most natural form. It gives subtle colours, which enhance the natural beauty of the different fibre structures in the grain and the various hide marks.

Nubuck Leather

Nubuck leathers have then been further processed to raise fibres on the grain side of the hide to give it a suede effect.

Semi-Aniline Leather

The leather has a light colour and finish applied to the surface, which reveals the natural characteristics of the hide to a lesser extent and increases the resistance to wear. This process balances out dye colour irregularities and allows a greater colour range.

Pigmented Leather

The surface of this leather has a pigment applied and a heavier protective coating giving a limitless colour range and excellent wear characteristics. Pigmented leathers are produced in two basic forms.
▪ Full Grain – the grain shows natural grain variation and all marks.
▪ Corrected Grain – a process where some of the grain layer and most of the natural hide marks are removed. The surface then has a print embossed on it giving a more uniform appearance.

As a general rule, the finer leathers are more susceptible to fading and staining and, therefore are more suitable to show and formal situations. The pigmented leathers and their heavier finishes are more durable in heavy traffic situations. This leather is used in virtually all automotive applications.
Prolonging the wear life of your leather furniture is simple

Prior to your keekï product leaving the factory, it will receive a final inspection. It will then be wrapped in order to protect it and minimise movement whilst in transit. Once unpacked, leather sofas may require “dressing”. This is quite normal, and very easy to perform using the following steps:

▪ Plump up the back cushions and arm pads of each sofa
▪ Ease the leather gently into shape with the palms of your hands
▪ Spread the leather across the seat cushions in the same way

Give the sofa time to “warm up” and relax (this may take a few days in a warm room).

Ensure your furniture avoids the following conditions:

Special Note: The salts and body oils, which occur naturally in human skin, can damage the surface of leather if left uncleaned for lengthy periods. In warm or humid weather it is important that leather be wiped over as often as weekly, particularly if the leather has become damp with perspiration or deposits of body oils are visible on areas such as head rests. Ensure non colour fast clothing does not come into contact with light coloured leathers.

Deterioration due to incorrect or inadequate maintenance cannot be considered a fault in the leather.

Cleaning

For general care we recommend regular dusting with a clean, dry cloth. In most instances, commercial cleaning products should be avoided, as they can be harsh on the leather or its protective coating. It is recommended that you use the keekï Ultimate Leather Care Kit . Proximity to heaters, fireplaces and direct sunlight should be avoided as this can cause leather to fade or crack over time.

For tea/coffee, soft drink, jam or other sugary products; use a clean, dry cloth or paper towel to quickly remove the liquid from the surface. Then gently remove the stain with a clean wet cloth, working from outside inwards. Do not soak the surface. Do not use a hair dryer or heater to dry your leather; blotting with a dry cloth is a much better approach.

For greasy stains like tomato sauce, chocolate or Vegemite; use an absorbent paper towel and apply just enough pressure to remove the substance. Avoid pushing or rubbing the substance further in to the leather. Use warm water and non toilet soaps which do not contain optical brighteners (consider Velvet soap, Lux Flakes, Softly) and use a dry towel to gently clean the stain, working from outside to the centre of the stain.

Light Cleaning – All Leather Types

Once a week wipe down with a clean, slightly damp dye fast cloth to remove dust and grime. Careful vacuuming with a suitable brush attachment is recommended for the removal of day to day dust, crumbs and other minor debris.

Pigmented Top-Coated and Semi-Aniline Leathers

Deep Cleaning: once every 3 -4 months, give your leather a deep clean to remove built up soiling and perspiration from the grain of your leather. Do one panel at a time using a soft leather brush to clean the grain. Apply your keekï Leather Conditioner/Protector to re-protect your leather. This keeps your leather soft, supple and conditioned for the flexing required in upholstery. The protector components in this product will provide excellent protection against soiling and spillages making cleaning easier and giving a soft sheen to top coated leathers.

Stain Removal

The removal of marks as soon as they are noticed invariably assists in the removal. If you cannot remove a mark with the keekï Leather Care Cleaner  as directed, don’t persist as you may damage the leather. Consult keekï or a leather repair company.

Spillage Removal

Soak up fluids as quickly as possible, removing the cushions (if loose) using a colour-fast towel. Wipe over your leather, rinsing cloth out in cold water and cleaning as you go. Whilst the area is still wet, clean using the keekï Leather Cleaner.

For further information, advice or to make an appointment please contact keekï online customer service on 03 9791 5200.

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When you invest in quality furniture you want to know that it will last. Understanding how to clean and care for these pieces will retain the look that made you fall in love with it in the first place. With proper cleaning, care and maintenance, it is possible to have all your furniture pieces looking its best for a long time. It pays to be consistent, and it’s not hard to do.

What you should know about glass and mirror

The use of glass and mirror for furniture has become very popular in both home and office applications. The advantage of using glass and mirror is that it provides a sleek and clean appearance, which blends well into current contemporary designs.

Frosted / sandblasted glass

Frosted or sandblasted glass is produced by the sandblasting or acid etching of clear sheet glass. It has the effect of rendering the glass translucent by scattering of light during transmission, thus blurring images while still transmitting light.

Starfire or crystal clear glass

A relatively new innovation, Starfire Glass is a lead free, low iron glass renowned for its crystal-like clarity. It is not quite clear enough to be labelled ‘crystal’ as a very slight blue tint is evident in the mostly-clear product. Standard float glass will always have a greenish tinge, especially when viewed end-on or when laminated. The relative uncoloured clarity of Starfire Glass lends itself to situations where the vivid colours of viewed objects behind the glass are to be displayed at their best. It is also important when painted colour is applied so you get the truest colour not changed by the green tinge.

Tempered / toughened / safety glass

Often called tempered, toughened or safety glass, tempered glass is one of two kinds of safety glass regularly used in applications in which standard glass could pose a potential danger. Tempered glass is four to five times stronger than standard glass and does not break into sharp shards when it breaks. Tempered glass is manufactured through a process of extreme heating and rapid cooling, making it harder than normal glass. The brittle nature of tempered glass causes it to shatter into small oval-shaped pebbles when broken. This eliminates the danger of sharp edges. Due to this property, along with its strength, tempered glass is often referred to as safety glass.

Prolonging the wear life of your furniture is simple

Many keekï products come with tempered glass. Although this is up to four times stronger than normal glass, it’s not unbreakable and should still be treated with care.

Always handle glass and mirrored furniture with care. Scratches, chips, sudden changes in temperature, hairline fractures or other minor impurities may cause the glass or mirror to break suddenly and without warning.

To keep your glass and or mirrored furniture in good condition, we recommend dusting with a clean, dry cloth to prevent dirt build up. Use a slightly damp chamois for general cleaning. (Leaving the surface dry after cleaning).

Clean glass and mirrored products with a glass cleaner following the instructions on the bottle. Use paper towels to minimise streaking. Don’t apply glass cleaners to surrounding surfaces (e.g. metal, stone or timber) or to the frosted side of frosted glass.

Do not use caustic or abrasive cleaning agents.

Do not use silicone based cleaning products.

Place any frosted glass, frosted side down. Don’t allow greasy or dirty items to come into contact with the frosted side. It can leave marks that are difficult to remove. Some minor marks can be removed with a cut, raw potato. Test in an inconspicuous area first.

Always protect glass and mirrored furniture from hot dishes or cookware with heat protectors and or placemats.

Use placemats or felt protectors under china, ceramics or other objects that may scratch the glass or mirror surface.

Items placed on your glass or mirrored furniture should be the correct weight for the glass or mirror thickness.

Please note: the information provided above is for guidance only, and is applicable to keekï purchased products. For further information, please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 9791 5200.

For further information, advice or to make an appointment please contact keekï online customer service on 03 9791 5200.
Back to top

When you invest in quality furniture you want to know that it will last. Understanding how to clean and care for these pieces will retain the look that made you fall in love with it in the first place. With proper cleaning, care and maintenance, it is possible to have all your furniture pieces looking its best for a long time. It pays to be consistent, and it’s not hard to do.

What you should know about two-pack polyurethane

Two-pack polyurethane is also referred to as polyurethane, emperite or high gloss finish. It is available in a satin or most commonly gloss finish. Two-pack polyurethane is a two-step process, which uses a chemical reaction between the paint and a hardener to cure. This gives furniture the high gloss finish which is durable and allowing any colour to be painted on silky smooth with no timber grain exposed.

Keekï’s two-pack finished products are sprayed over MDF (medium density fibreboard), a composite wood product. It is ideal for many applications including cabinetry to moulding, because it is smooth, uniform and won’t warp. It is these properties, which make it ideal for the painting of gloss finishes.

Two-pack polyurethane, just like car paint, can be touched up but not repaired without respraying the entire surface.

Prolonging the wear life of your furniture is simple

One of the main benefits of investing in two-pack polyurethane furniture is the longevity and timeless style that it provides.

To keep your two-pack polyurethane furniture in good condition, we recommend dusting with a clean, dry cloth to prevent dirt build up. Use a soft cloth wrung dry from plain water for general cleaning (leaving the surface dry after cleaning).

Do not use general household cleaning products that contain silicones. Many supermarket polishes and waxes contain high levels of silicon and petroleum distillate, which can damage surfaces.

Do not place chemical products on the surface – e.g. pot pourri oil, perfume, nail polish remover, eucalyptus oil. All will react to the lacquered surface.

Always protect your furniture from hot surfaces with heat protectors and or placemats. Heat directly on two-pack polyurethane finishes can result in markings, which are difficult to remove.

Do not expose your furniture to direct sunlight or extremes of humidity. Prolonged exposure to direct sunlight (summer and winter) must be avoided as it can cause excessive fading, drying, splitting and warping.

Do not allow hot or cold abrasive items to come into contact with surfaces.

Use placemats or felt protectors under china, ceramics or other objects that may scratch the two-pack polyurethane surface.

Please note: the information provided above is for guidance only, and is applicable to keekï purchased products. For further information, please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 9791 5200.

For further information, advice or to make an appointment please contact keekï online customer service on 03 9791 5200.

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When you invest in quality furniture you want to know that it will last. Understanding marble and other stone products and how to clean and care for these pieces will retain the look that made you fall in love with it in the first place. With proper cleaning, care and maintenance, it is possible to have all your marble and stone pieces looking its best for a long time. It pays to be consistent, and it’s not hard to do.

What you should know about marble & stone

Stone, including marble, slate, granite and travertine, is very durable but should not be treated as indestructible. These beautiful materials are quarried from all over the world. Every region is unique in colour, veining, pits and seams. From piece to piece and even on a single quarried slab, there will be certain colour variations. Stone surfaces will have pits and fissures that appear as cracks. They result from immense heat and pressure, which formed the stone eons ago. These characteristics are not an indication of an inferior product, defects in the stone nor do they reduce the performance or longevity of the stone, but are simply hallmarks of a natural material, which adds to the uniqueness and beauty of the stone.

Although marble and stone is a natural material, it does require some care. Please see care tips and information on more common stones.

Granite

Granite is an igneous stone, which are mainly formed through volcanic material such as magma. It is primarily made of quartz, feldspar and potassium. It usually comes in dark colours and contains very little calcite, if any. It provides a heavy crystalline and granular appearance with mineral grains. It is a very hard material and easier to maintain than other stones. Yet, it is still porous and will stain. There are different types of granite depending on the percentage mix of quartz, mica and feldspar. Black granite is known as an Anorthosite. It contains very little quartz and feldspar and has a different composition than true granite.

Man made stones (Caesarstone, Quantum Quartz etc)

Man made or engineered stones like Caesarstone and Quantum Quartz is used for its beauty, strength and durability. It is created from a mix of natural quartz aggregates, organic pigments and enhanced polymer resins, which provides a surface with exceptional properties of stain, scratch and chip resistance.

Marble

Marble is a metamorphic stone. It is a recrystallized limestone that formed when the limestone softened from heat and pressure and recrystallized into marble where a mineral change occurred. The main consistency is calcium and dolomite. Ranges in many colours and is usually heavily veined and shows grains.

Prolonging the wear life of your furniture is simple

To keep your marble and stone furniture in good condition, we recommend dusting with a clean, dry cloth, or wiping down with soft cloth wrung dry from plain water (leaving the surface dry after cleaning).

Always protect marble or stone furniture from hot dishes or cookware with heat protectors and or placemats. Heat directly on stone can result in markings, which cannot be removed.

Although we have applied a clear resin to enhance the appearance and to make your marble and stone furniture more resistant to staining, it is still recommended that spillages, especially wine, must be wiped off immediately with a damp cloth to avoid staining.

Do not allow hot or cold abrasive items to come into contact with surfaces.
Do not use acidic, lemon or vinegar based cleaners, bleach, ammonia or other general-purpose cleaners.
Do not use cleaners that contain acid such as bathroom cleaners, grout cleaners, or tub and tile cleaners.

Do not place chemical products on the surface – e.g. pot pourri oil, perfume, nail polish remover, eucalyptus oil. All will react to the lacquered surface.
Do not use abrasive cleaners in either dry or liquid forms.
Do not use alkaline cleaners not specifically formulated for natural stone.

Use placemats or felt protectors under china, ceramics or other objects that may scratch the stone or resin surface.

Do not attempt to drag or move your marble or stone furniture, as it will stress the frame. For smaller marble or stone pieces, have someone help to carefully lift it from both ends when moving. Professional marble handlers are experienced in moving heavy marble and stone dining tables. Please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 9791 5200 for further information.

Spot cleaning

– For liquid spills
Blot away the excess liquid with a clean, dry colourfast cloth; turning the cloth frequently. Complete by wiping with a clean damp colourfast cloth. Repeat if necessary.

– For food spills
Remove food with a non-abrasive item such as a plastic spoon. Blot with clean, dry colourfast cloth. Lightly spray clean lukewarm water onto surface, wipe over surface with a clean colourfast cloth. Complete by wiping with a clean damp colourfast cloth. Repeat if necessary.

Please note: the information provided above is for guidance only, and is applicable to keekï purchased products. For further information, please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 9791 5200.

For further information, advice or to make an appointment please contact keekï online customer service on 03 9791 5200.

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When you invest in quality furniture you want to know that it will last. Understanding different metals and how to clean and care for these pieces will retain the look that made you fall in love with it in the first place. With proper cleaning, care and maintenance, it is possible to have all your furniture pieces looking its best for a long time. It pays to be consistent, and it’s not hard to do.

What you should know about metal

Different metals are commonly used in furniture bases, accent pieces, frames and homewares. Each metal has its own characteristics and features which add to the beauty of the furniture piece.

Although metal is a natural material, it does require some care. Please see care tips and information on more common metals.

Aluminium

A durable, yet lightweight metal that is very malleable and easily shaped. It is naturally resistant to oxidation and will not rust.

Copper

A reddish-brown metal that is easily shaped manipulated and hammered. Copper can be maintained with cleaning products or can be left to naturally oxidize to a vibrant green colour.

Chrome

This is a type of metal finish which uses a thin layer of chrome that is applied by electroplating onto a steel surface. The result is a brighter, mirror like finish.

Powdercoat

This is a type of metal finish which is an extremely durable electrostatic finish achieved by coating metal furniture with electrically charged paint powder that is then baked and fused to the metal surface. The result is smooth, even and durable.

Stainless steel

Stainless steel does not readily corrode, rust or stain with water as ordinary steel does, but despite the name it is not fully stain-proof, most notably under low oxygen, high salinity, or poor circulation environments. Tea staining is the discolouration of the surface of stainless steel. It is a cosmetic issue that does not affect the structural integrity or lifetime of the material. Tea staining occurs most commonly within about five kilometres of the beach and becomes progressively worse closer to the marine source.

There are different grades and surface finishes of stainless steel to suit the environment the alloy must endure. Below are a few that are commonly used in furniture products.

201 grade (indoor only) comes in a polished mirror finish only, and is used on most keekï products with a polished finish. It is as strong as the 304 grade stainless steel.

304 grade (indoor and outdoor) comes in a polished or brushed finish. It is the standard ‘18/18’ stainless steel used for most brushed finish furniture.

316 grade (marine grade) used most often on boats or places close to harsh ocean conditions.

Stainless steel surfaces can be rejuvenated with the application of a stainless steel cleaner. We recommend a two-step process. First wipe the stainless steel with soapy water to get off grease and salt deposits from the air, then apply the product (or stainless steel wipe) along the grain. This will leave a microscopic film on the surface for additional protection.

Wrought iron

A pure form of iron that is tough yet easily ‘wrought’ or ‘worked’ by hand into a welded design.

Prolonging the wear life of your furniture is simple

Metals like silver, pewter, brass or bronze can add flair and style to most settings, and are most often seen in homewares. Tarnishing is a common care issue, and best dealt with by using a metal cleaner and a clean, soft cloth. Undiluted detergents or abrasive cleaners can damage metal pieces, and should be avoided.

Iron and bronze pieces are best cared for cleaning with warm soapy water, and by waxing to give them a lift.

To keep your metal furniture in good condition, we recommend dusting with a clean, dry cloth, or wiping down with a soft cloth wrung dry from plain water (leaving the surface dry after cleaning).

Clean regularly.

Please note: the information provided above is for guidance only, and is applicable to keekï purchased products. For further information, please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 9791 5200.

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When you invest in quality furniture you want to know that it will last. Understanding timber and how to clean and care for your timber furniture will retain the look that made you fall in love with it in the first place. With proper cleaning, care and maintenance, it is possible to have all your timber pieces looking its best for a long time. It pays to be consistent, and it’s not hard to do.

What you should know about timber

Because every piece of wood is unique, the beauty of timber furniture is its individuality.
Timber is versatile and flexible in complementing many different interior styles. These vary from recycled timbers, rough sawn timbers to local hardwoods more commonly Victorian Ash or Tasmanian Oak.

Timbers take some time to stabilise, both while they are being produced, and after you take them home. Timbers will absorb varying degrees of moisture depending on their environment (e.g. humid areas create higher moisture absorption, whereas timbers in air conditioned or cooler areas are generally drier). Changes in environment over time can create expansions and contractions in the wood, and cracking or warping is not uncommon. (These can easily be rectified with an appropriately coloured wax, wood filler or touch up pen) These characteristics, along with naturally occurring knots, gum veins or variations, are not an indication of an inferior product, defects in timber nor do they reduce the performance or longevity of the timber, but are simply hallmarks of genuine quality timber, which adds to the uniqueness and should be embraced as an integral part of your furniture’s history.

Although timber is a natural product, they do require some care. Please see care tips and information on more common timbers.

American Ash

American Ash is the trade name for a variety of sub species of Ash that are grown in the eastern parts of the USA. It is similar in appearance to European Ash, with very pale sapwood and heartwood that varies from a greyish brown to light brown, or a pale yellow with brown streaks. American Ash has good strength properties and is usually straight-grained with a uniform texture. It is easily worked, responding well to nailing, screwing and gluing. It is a common application for furniture and is available in Australia from specialist timber suppliers as both sawn timber and veneer.

Blackwood

Blackwood is a medium-sized Australian hardwood that grows in South Australia and the eastern states. In the wetter areas of Tasmania it is grown in large volumes for commercial use. Blackwood timber is sought after for its impressive appearance and finish qualities. The heartwood is a rich, golden brown, sometimes complimented by reddish streaks or a narrow band of darker colour, indicative of the growth rings. The sapwood can be up to 50mm wide and is much paler in appearance. Even-textured, the Blackwood grain can either be straight or have a wavy, fiddleback pattern, which is valued for furniture and veneers.

Chestnut

Commonly known as Sweet Chestnut, this tree is native throughout the British Isles, Europe and Asia Minor. Sweet chestnut timber is pale brown to biscuit in colour. The grain varies from straight to spiral. The texture of the timber is coarse. The heartwood is very durable and incredibly resistant to preservative treatment. It is used as a common application for furniture which holds stain and polishes well.

Tasmanian Oak

Tasmanian Oak is the name used for three almost identical species of eucalypt hardwoods that are normally marketed collectively. Warm, dense and resilient, Tasmanian Oak is the preferred hardwood for a wide range of applications and is an extremely popular timber in furniture applications. It works extremely well and produces an excellent finish. Tasmanian Oak is light in colour, varying from straw to reddish brown with intermediate shades of cream to pink. It is recognised for its excellent staining qualities, which allow ready matching with other timbers, finishes or furnishings.

Tasmanian Oak is marketed under different names depending on where it is being sold. In Victoria and NSW it is also sold under the trade name Victorian Ash.

Teak

Teak’s heartwood is typically golden brown in colour, although grey and red tinges are not uncommon. The sapwood, a pale yellow colour, is clearly distinct. Grain is usually straight, but due to Teak’s high degree of ring porosity, longitudinal streaks and an uneven texture, ranging from coarse to smooth, are typical. Teak occurs naturally in the monsoon forests of India, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam and is used extensively in furniture production. Its high oil content, strong tensile strength and tight grain makes it particularly suitable for outdoor – patio furniture applications. Teak will readily accept paints and stains. It also varnishes, polishes and waxes well. Practically imperishable under cover, it has been known to last in temples for centuries.

Victorian Ash

Victorian Ash is the trade name for two of the tallest hardwood species in the world. This Australian hardwood takes its name from the fact that it grows in the alpine areas of Victoria, Tasmania and New South Wales. Victorian Ash features a moderately course texture and has a predominately straight grain, although it may be wavy in parts resulting in a fiddleback appearance. Gum veins are also a common appearance feature. It will provide a light, creamy-coloured timber for appearance applications, although it can be stained to almost any shade and is regarded as one of the best and most versatile finishing timbers available.

Prolonging the wear life of your furniture is simple

To keep your timber furniture in good condition, we recommend dusting with a clean, dry cloth, or wiping down with soft cloth wrung dry from plain water (leaving the surface dry after cleaning). Wipe gently in the direction of the grain, never in a circular motion.

If the timber is a rough, recycled or raw surface, additional special care must be taken not to cause soiling or catching of the cleaning material used.

Clean regularly.

Do not use general household cleaning products that contain silicones. Many supermarket polishes and waxes contain high levels of silicon and petroleum distillate which can damage timber surfaces.

Do not place chemical products on the surface – e.g. pot pourri oil, perfume, nail polish remover, eucalyptus oil. All will react to the lacquered surface.

Always protect timber from hot surfaces with heat protectors and or placemats. Heat directly on timber can result in markings which are difficult to remove.

Spillages, especially alcohol, must be wiped off immediately with a damp cloth.

Do not expose timber to direct sunlight or extremes of humidity. Prolonged exposure to direct sunlight (summer and winter) must be avoided as it can cause excessive fading, drying, splitting and warping.

Do not conceal the tops of your furniture with glass covers. This can result in sweating of timber and peeling of stain may occur.

Do not allow hot or cold abrasive items to come into contact with surfaces.

Do not allow liquid or damp cloths to remain in contact with timber surfaces.

Please note: the information provided above is for guidance only, and is applicable to keekï purchased products. For further information, please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 9791 5200.

 

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Rugs can be a great addition to any room, adding to its appeal and insulating the area in cooler months. A rug can also make a great statement piece, balancing a room. It can add warmth and colour – particularly helpful in rooms featuring timber or tile flooring. Understanding different rug fibres and weaves and how to clean and care for your rug will retain the look that made you fall in love with it in the first place. With proper cleaning, care and maintenance, it is possible to have your rug looking its best for a long time. It pays to be consistent, and it’s not hard to do.

What you should know about rugs

Believe it or not, most modern-day rugs are made with the same techniques used by master weavers for hundreds of years. The finest hand-woven rugs still require considerable time and attention to detail. While machine-made rugs can be made more quickly, the same basic techniques remain in place.

Hand-Knotted

Hand-knotting is the most labour-intensive rug-making technique. Master weavers tie individual knots to the warp yarns that make up the length of a rug. Together, these knots form the actual surface, or pile, of the rug. In general, the more knots, the more durable and valuable the rug. Also, no two hand-knotted rugs are exactly alike, which adds to the uniqueness and should be embraced as an integral part of your rug’s history.

Tufted

Easier to manufacture, tufted rugs are created without knots. Instead, loops of yarn are simply pulled through a rug’s backing material, either by machine or hand-held tool. The loops are then sheared to create a smooth, cut-pile surface. Since less work is involved, even the highest-quality tufted rugs can be produced relatively quickly and inexpensively. Note that tufted rugs tend to shed more than other rugs, which may require more frequent vacuuming.

Hooked

Hooking is just like tufting, except the yarn loops stay intact. In a hooked rug, loops of yarn are pulled through the rug’s backing material by machine or with a hand-held hooking needle. Instead of being sheared, the loops are left alone, creating a knobby, embroidered look.

Flat-Woven

Unlike the rugs above, flat-weaves do not have a pile. Instead, the rug’s vertical yarns (warps) are simply woven through the horizontal yarns (wefts). Flat-woven rugs can be produced by hand or machine.

Braided

Braided rugs, like flat-weaves, do no not have a pile and are usually reversible. Yarns are braided into one continuous rope that is then sewn together in a spiral fashion. The result is a very strong, durable piece that holds up in nearly any environment.

Materials

How your rug looks, feels and performs is also dependent on the materials used. Every fibre or fabric has its own unique characteristics and advantages.

Cotton

Taken right from the cotton plant, this natural fibre is both soft and strong. Cotton rugs can easily absorb a variety of dyes, allowing for many colour options and designs. The fabric also makes a great backing material, helping the rug keep its shape and lie flat against the floor.

Benefits: Easy to clean, machine-washable, biodegradable
Considerations: Attracts dust easily, wears quickly

Grass fibres

Jute, sisal and coir are common examples of natural grass fibres used in area rugs. Extracted from their respective plants, these fibres are generally flat-woven to produce extremely strong, durable rugs. These fibres are processed without the addition of harsh chemicals, making the production of these rugs environmentally friendly.

Benefits: Extremely strong, durable, highly textured
Considerations: Coarse feel, prone to stains

Silk

A natural protein fibre, silk is often blended with other rug fabrics to produce a distinctive softness and sheen. The fibre’s unique structure refracts light at different angles, giving it its shimmering appearance. Because silk is created from harvested larvae cocoons of silkworms, the production process can be tricky and time-consuming. Not surprisingly, even the smallest addition of silk can increase a rug’s cost.

Benefits: Very soft, strong, distinctive sheen
Considerations: More difficult to clean, shows footprints

Synthetic

Synthetic or manmade fibres are created from materials such as nylon, polypropylene, acrylic and viscose. In rugs, these materials are often used to mimic the characteristics of natural fibres. For example, polypropylene is often used an inexpensive, but comparably soft substitute for wool.

Benefits: Strong, stain-resistant, great for high-traffic areas
Considerations: Crushes easily under heavy furniture

Wool

Produced from the fleece of sheep, wool is a natural fibre that is highly regarded for its strength, durability and luxurious softness. Higher-quality wools tend to come from New Zealand or Tibet, where sheep produce high levels of lanolin. This natural substance enhances the fibre’s strength and texture.

Benefits: Soft, durable, easy to clean
Considerations: Prone to early shedding, colour fading

Prolonging the wear life of your rug is simple

Do not expose your rug to direct sunlight or extremes of humidity. Prolonged exposure to direct sunlight (summer and winter) must be avoided as it can cause excessive fading.

Rug pad or underlay

A non-slip rug pad/underlay is highly recommended when laying your rug on a hardwood, carpet or tile floor. This will keep your rug in place.

Rug Rotation

To ensure even wear, be sure to rotate your rug once a year.

Furniture Placement

When placing your furniture, lightly set it down and then move it slightly in the direction of the pile at least once a week.

Vacuuming

Vacuum your rug using a low-powered vacuum cleaner.
 Should long ends of yarns appear on the surface do not pull. Use scissors to trim yarn evenly with the rug surface.

Storing

When storing your rug do not fold or put in an airtight plastic bag. 
It is advisable to roll with the rug backing showing and wrap it with cloth for protection.

Cleaning

For surface cleaning
Using a sponge, wipe a mixture of mild dish soap and water lightly over the entire surface of the
rug. Remove by wiping again using a clean cloth and water.

For deep cleaning:
Your rug should be professionally cleaned every 3-5 years or when you notice the colours to be less vibrant. Rugs in extremely high traffic areas may require more frequent cleaning.

Stains

• The best way to remove any stain is to treat it IMMEDIATELY.
• Dilute the area with soda water or water and salt and let absorb into the stain.
• Using a clean, white cloth or paper towel, cover the area and press down several times with your hand or foot.
• Continue to blot the area until the stain is removed.
• DO NOT RUB – this will only work the stain into the fibres much deeper.
• If the stain persists, contact a professional rug cleaning specialist immediately.

Please note: the information provided above is for guidance only, and is applicable to keekï purchased products. Please check the care label on the back of your rug for specific rug care.

For further information, please contact keekï online customer service department on 03 9791 5200.
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